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IGG Mulyagonja appointed Court of Appeal judge, as Nakalema becomes rooted

IGG Mulyagonja appointed Court of Appeal judge, as Nakalema becomes rooted

FEATURED, Latest News, NEWS
mulya Out of favor Inspector General of Government (IGG), Irene Mulyagoja has been appointed a judge in the Court of Appeal. Mulyagonja’s appointment was made by President Museveni and forwarded to parliament for approval. Also appointed to the court of appeal are; Monica Kalyegira and Kibeedi Muzamiru. In the same appointment, Museveni 12 candidates to the High Court, who include among others; Odoki Phillip, Esther Nambayo, Boniface Wamala, Jane Okuo, and Jeanne Rwakakoko. In May, a concerned citizen wrote to the Judicial Service Commission to block her appointment at the Court of Appeal. “The judiciary being an arm of government and is mandated to dispense justice, without fear or favour, it should therefore staffed with people of integrity but unfortunately hon. Iren
Mobile-based lending is a double-edged sword in Kenya

Mobile-based lending is a double-edged sword in Kenya

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Over the past 10 years mobile-based lending has grown in Kenya. Some estimates put the number of mobile lending platforms at 49. The industry is largely unregulated but includes major financial players. Banks such as Kenya Commercial Bank, Commercial Bank of Africa, Equity Bank and Coop Bank offer instant mobile loans. These lending services have been made possible by the ballooning financial technology (fintech) industry. Since the early 2000s, Kenya has been touted as a centre of technological innovation from which novel financial offerings have emerged. Mobile company Safaricom’s M-Pesa is a well-known example. It is no surprise, therefore, that technology and unregulated lending have developed together so strongly in Kenya. The speed and ease of access to credit thr
South Sudanese teacher dedicates his life in exile to refugees of all ages

South Sudanese teacher dedicates his life in exile to refugees of all ages

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The chorus of children’s voices coming from teacher Koat Reath’s classroom grows louder and louder, threatening to drown out other classes at his primary school in Jewi camp for South Sudanese refugees in western Ethiopia.The 41-year-old has his pupils on their feet, clapping and reciting the alphabet in Nuer, their native tongue, followed by a few phrases that are sung with gusto in English. He believes children learn better when their lessons are lively and fun. With almost a decade of teaching under his belt, Koat knows a thing or two about holding young students’ attention – though this can be difficult in Jewi where more than 100 children are crammed into one classroom at any time. Luckily, his energy levels easily match those of the five- to 15-year-olds in his class. “I u
I salute I.K Musaazi because he took on colonial resistance when Africa was down

I salute I.K Musaazi because he took on colonial resistance when Africa was down

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President Museveni has said that Ignatius Kangave Musaazi falls in the same category as the likes of South Africa’s Nelson Mandela who filled the vacuum when Africa was leaderless and down. According to President Museveni, it is not possible to mention people like I.K Musaazi without talking about Africa, because they were the glue the united the continent to put up resistance in the face of colonialism. Museveni made the remarks Friday at Sheraton Kampala Hotel, during a fundraising dinner for the I.K Musaazi Innovations Institute. The fundraising dinner was organized by Musaazi’s family together with Uhuru Institute for Social Development. Speaking to the audience that comprised family members and friends of IK Musaazi, former deputy chief justice Steven Kavuma, Ugandan
Met police admits it lacks records of King’s Cross face matches

Met police admits it lacks records of King’s Cross face matches

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Last month, it acknowledged it had shared people's pictures with the managers of the city's King's Cross Estate development. It had previously denied the alliance. In a new report, the Met added that it had only shared seven images and did not believe there had been similar arrangements with other private bodies. It said the pictures were of "persons who had been arrested and charged/cautioned/reprimanded or given a formal warning" and had been provided by Camden Borough Police. The aim, it added, had been to "prevent crime, to protect vulnerable members of the community or to support the safety strategy". But it admitted that it had no record of whether the estate manager's surveillance camera system had ever made facial matches of those involved, nor whether any police actio
China and Taiwan clash over Wikipedia edits

China and Taiwan clash over Wikipedia edits

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Ask Google or Siri: "What is Taiwan?" "A state", they will answer, "in East Asia". But earlier in September, it would have been a "province in the People's Republic of China". For questions of fact, many search engines, digital assistants and phones all point to one place: Wikipedia. And Wikipedia had suddenly changed. The edit was reversed, but soon made again. And again. It became an editorial tug of war that - as far as the encyclopedia was concerned - caused the state of Taiwan to constantly blink in and out of existence over the course of a single day. "This year is a very crazy year," sighed Jamie Lin, a board member of Wikimedia Taiwan. "A lot of Taiwanese Wikipedians have been attacked." Edit wars Wikipedia is a movement as much as a website. Anyone can ...
Facebook can be ordered to remove posts worldwide

Facebook can be ordered to remove posts worldwide

FEATURED, TECH
Facebook and similar apps and websites can be ordered to take down illegal posts worldwide after a landmark ruling from the EU's highest court. Platforms may also have to seek out similar examples of the illegal content and remove them, instead of waiting for each to be reported. One expert said it was a significant ruling with global implications. Facebook said the judgement raised "critical questions around freedom of expression". What was the case about? The case stemmed from an insulting comment posted on Facebook about Austrian politician Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek, which the country's courts said damaged her reputation. Under EU law, Facebook and other platforms are not held responsible for illegal content posted by users, until they have been made aware of it - at w...